Ask Me Anything: Invoicing and Client Leads

On Thursday, I mentioned that I was in the process of sending out invoices on Twitter. Katharine O’Moore-Klopf asked,

I’m curious why you prefer invoicing on 1st of month rather than at end of each gig.

For me, it comes down to the types of projects I work on. Many of my clients I work with on a long-term basis, such as my blogging clients. I write on a regular schedule for these clients and then send in an invoice for my work once a month. For other projects, I invoice in different ways.

Katharine takes on a different type of project — such as copy editing books — and she mentioned that she usually invoices her clients either at the end of the whole project or divides the project into two invoicing periods, sending one out halfway through the project and the other at the end.

I’ve also taken on quite a few projects where I sent in an invoice at the end of the work. I’ve noticed that some clients will request invoices be submitted at certain points or on certain dates. While I’d love it if clients would conform to my invoicing schedule, I’m willing to adapt in order to get paid.

Caitlin Fitzsimmons asked a follow up question to last week’s comment about finding clients. I had pointed to Demand Studio as one option for work:

I’d not heard of Demand Studios so thanks for the tip-off. Do you have any other suggestions (or a previous post on this topic you could point me too)? I am an experienced writer but new to the US market.

There are a couple of sites I’ve found to be good places to pick up work either when you’re starting out or when you need to fill some gaps in your schedule. Here are a few that I’ve either worked for in the past or I know other writers have enjoyed working for.

Just one note, though: While you can make some money working with these sites, I do recommend that writers keep looking for bigger and better things. There’s a definite limit on the amount of money you can earn from these sites.

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